Fighting Diabetes – Sprouts Can Help

November 14 is World Diabetes Day. On this day 200 diabetic member associations in over 160 different countries observe World Diabetes Day by raising awareness about this disease through meetings and lectures, conferences, sporting events and television and radio programs.

Almost 10% of American adults are living with diabetes, and another 86 million are considered pre-diabetic. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the US, much of it preventable. Developing countries have seen a steady rise in diabetes as they adopt the western diet and lifestyle. Diabetes has become a global problem.

There are two main types of Diabetes: Type 1 and type 2. Type 1 occurs when the body fails to produce insulin which is a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches and other foods into energy. This type is usually found in children, and accounts for approximately 5% of diabetics. Type 2 occurs when the pancreas is still capable of making insulin but the body develops an insulin resistance. Eventually the pancreas can’t keep up with the demand for more and more insulin to overcome the body’s resistance.

Type 2 diabetes is preventable with lifestyle and dietary changes. This means exercise and a diet rich in healthy foods and lesser amounts of carbohydrates and starches. Sprouts are categorized as a non-starchy vegetable by the American Diabetes Association and are incorporated into some of their suggested recipes for those who are diabetic. These recipes include Mediterranean Roll-ups, Spring Lettuce Rolls, and Fabulous Stir Fry.

Besides being part of a healthy diet, sprouts can help in the treatment of disease. A high concentration of medicinal compounds makes sprouts a functional food which can play a part in treating specific diseases. Scientific studies have shown that sprouts can have a positive effect on controlling diabetes. Below are summaries of these studies.

Antidiabetic activity of Mung bean extracts in diabetic KK-Ay mice.

J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Oct 8;56(19):8869-73. Epub 2008 Sep 4
Yao Y, Chen F, Wang M, Wang J, Ren G.
Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, No. 80 South Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

The antidiabetic effects of Mung bean sprout (MBS) extracts and Mung bean seed coat (MBSC) extracts were investigated in type 2 diabetic mice. Male KK-A (y) mice and C57BL/6 mice were used in this study. In KK-A (y) mice, the blood glucose, plasma C-peptide, glucagon, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were significantly higher than those in the C57BL/6 mice ( P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01). In addition, KK-A (y) mice showed an obvious decrease in insulin immunoreactivity in pancreas as well. MBS and MBSC were orally administrated to KK-A (y) mice for 5 weeks. It was found that MBS (2 g/kg) and MBSC (3 g/kg) lowered blood glucose, plasma C-peptide, glucagon, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and BUN levels and at the same time markedly improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin immunoreactive levels. These results suggest that MBS and MBSC exert an antidiabetic effect in type 2 diabetic mice.

Broccoli sprouts powder could improve serum triglyceride and oxidized LDL/LDL-cholesterol ratio in type 2 diabetic patients: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2012 Feb 8.
Bahadoran Z, Mirmiran P, Hosseinpanah F, Rajab A, Asghari G, Azizi F.
Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:  In this study, broccoli sprout powder (BSP), a good source of bioactive components, was used as supplementary treatment in type 2 diabetic patients.

METHODS:  This randomized clinical trial included 81 patients with type 2 diabetes. Participants were randomly assigned to consume 10g/d BSP (group A), 5g/d BSP (group B), or the placebo (group C), each for 4 weeks. Fasting blood glucose (FBS), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride concentration (TG), LDL-C, HDL-C, and oxidized-LDL were measured at baseline and 4 weeks after treatment. The ratios of OX-LDL/LDL, atherogenic index of plasma (AIP; log TG/HDL), TC/HDL and LDL/HDL were calculated as cardiovascular risk factors parameters, at baseline and 4 weeks after treatment.

RESULTS:  Seventy-two patients completed the study; n=23, 26 and 23 for groups A, B and C, respectively. After 4 weeks, BSP in dose of 10g/d, significantly decreased serum triglycerides, OX-LDL/LDL ratio and AIP (p<0.05 for treatment effect). HDL-C concentration was significantly higher (p<0.01 for treatment) in group A as compared with group B and placebo.

CONCLUSIONS: BSP as supplementary treatment in type 2 diabetes could have favorable effects on lipid profiles and OX-LDL/LDL ratio, as risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Broccoli sprouts reduce oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes: a randomized double-blind clinical trial.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011 Aug;65(8):972-7. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2011.59. Epub 2011 May 11.
Bahadoran Z, Mirmiran P, Hosseinpanah F, Hedayati M, Hosseinpour-Niazi S, Azizi F.
Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:In vitro and animal studies have reported that young broccoli sprouts improve oxidative stress status in diabetic condition. The objective of this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial was to investigate the effects of broccoli sprouts powder (BSP) on some oxidative stress parameters in type 2 diabetes patients.

SUBJECTS/METHODS: A total of 81 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups for 4 weeks. The groups received either 10?g/d BSP (n=27), 5?g/d BSP (n=29) or placebo (n=25). Serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), malondialdehyde (MDA) and oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were measured at baseline and at 4 weeks after treatment.

RESULTS: In all, 63 patients in three groups were included in the analysis: 10?g/d BSP (n=21), 5?g/d (n=22) and placebo (n=20). After 4 weeks, consumption of BSP resulted in significant decrease in MDA (P=0.001 for treatment effect), oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.03 for treatment effect), OSI (P=0.001 for treatment effect) and significant increase in TAC (P=0.001 for treatment effect). No effects were found on TOS.

CONCLUSION: BSP had favorable effects on oxidative stress status in type 2 diabetes patients.